Veneers

34If you want to improve your smile, dental veneers are a simple option. Veneers are thin coverings that are placed over the front (visible) part of the tooth. They look like natural teeth. Veneers can be used to correct a wide range of dental issues, such as:

  • Teeth that are stained and can’t be whitened by bleaching
  • Chipped or worn teeth
  • Crooked or misshapen teeth
  • Uneven spaces or a large gap between the upper front teeth

Porcelain Lab Veneers

A porcelain veneer is a thin shell that is custom-made to fit on the tooth.

Benefits of porcelain veneers:

  • They are strong and long-lasting
  • They have a natural-looking surface
  • Less tooth enamel needs to be removed than with a crown or cap
  • They don’t stain easily

Composite resin veneers (Chairside)

A composite resin veneer is made from a tooth-colored filling material bonded to the tooth.

Benefits of composite resin veneers:

  • Usually less tooth enamel needs to be removed than for the crowns or porcelain veneers
  • May mean fewer visits to the dentist- sometimes these veneers take just one visit
  • Cost less than porcelain veneers
  • Are easy to fix if they get damaged; although composite veneers are generally not as strong or wear-resistant as porcelain veneers, composite veneers can be repaired easily and quickly

After you get veneers

• Veneers can chip OR BREAK UNDER PRESSURE. Avoid biting your fingernails and chewing on hard objects, such as pencils or ice.

• It may take you a few days to get used to the feel of your veneers. But do let your dentist know if your bite does not feel right after the veneer has been placed. Dr. Georgy will correct the bite before leaving.

• Keep your teeth and gums clean by brushing and flossing daily. You can still get cavities under or around veneers. Look for dental products that show the ADA seal of acceptance.

Both amalgam and composite fillings can crack, either soon after they are placed or after the fillings have been in place for some time.

  • Cracks can occur soon after a filling is placed if the filling is higher than the rest of the tooth surface, and must bear most of the force of biting. Cracks also can occur over time, as the forces from chewing and biting affect the filling and the restored tooth.

Small cracks also can occur at the edges of a filling. These usually are caused by wear over time. These cracks often can be repaired.

A filling is said to be leaking when the side of the filling doesn’t fit tightly against the tooth. Debris and saliva can seep down between the filling and the tooth. This can lead to decay, discoloration or sensitivity.

Both amalgam and composite fillings can leak. An amalgam filling sometimes leaks slightly after it is placed. You would notice this as sensitivity to cold. This sensitivity decreases for the next two to three weeks. Then it disappears altogether. Over that period, the amalgam filling naturally corrodes. The corrosion seals the edges of the filling and stops any leaks.

A composite filling could be contaminated with saliva. This would weaken the bond between the filling and the tooth and allow for leaks. Other times, there may be small gaps where the tooth and filling meet. These gaps are caused by shrinkage when your dentist places the filling. Sensitivity after receiving a composite filling may disappear over time. If it doesn’t, the filling may need to be replaced.

Fillings also can leak as a result of wear over time. These fillings should be replaced.

Some fillings can last for 15 years or longer. Others, however, will have to be replaced in as little as 5 years. Your dentist can determine if your fillings are worn enough that they need to be replaced.

If you clench or grind your teeth, you may have more problems with your fillings. The forces placed on your teeth can lead to tooth sensitivity and extra wear on your fillings. Clenching or grinding also can cause your teeth and fillings to crack or develop small craze lines. These are fine cracks you can see if you shine a light on your tooth.

Ideal Dentistry TherapyPost Op Instructions

Your anesthesia will wear off in approximately 1 to 3 hours after the procedure. It is very important not to chew on the numb side (to prevent biting tongue, lip, etc.) until the anesthesia wears off.

Your tooth (or teeth) may be sensitive to hot, cold or pressure from the procedure. This is COMPLETELY normal. The more invasive the procedure, the more sensitivity you may experience. The possible symptoms of hot, cold or pressure will cease within a few days to a couple of weeks. In very few instances, this sensitivity could last longer than a couple of weeks. As long as your teeth or gums are continuing to feel better, (not staying the same, or getting worse) everything is fine. There is no need for concern.

We may have prescribed Ibuprofen (Motrin). This IS NOT for pain. Ibuprofen is to reduce the inflammation in the area worked on, and will further eliminate hot, cold and pressure sensitivity if taken as directed. If you are allergic to or cannot tolerate ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil, etc) please advise us. If discomfort continues for more than a couple of weeks, please call our office at 813-960-4744

Once the anesthesia has worn off and you feel as though any of the teeth we have worked on are hitting first, please give the office a call immediately. This imbalance with your bite may cause further discomfort and should be adjusted.